Museum

Porsche Carrera GT

The development of Carrera GT can be traced back to its predecessors, the 911 GT1 and LMP1-98 racing cars. Due in part to the FIA and ACO rule changes in 1998, both designs had ended. Porsche at the time had planned on a new Le Mans prototype for 1999. The car was initially intended to use a turbocharged flat-6, but was later redesigned to use a new V10 engine, pushing the project back to planned competition in 2000. The V10 was a unit secretly built by Porsche for the Footwork Formula One team in 1992, but later shelved. The engine was resurrected for the Le Mans prototype and increased in size to 5.7 litres. Unfortunately the project was canceled after two days of testing for the first car, in mid-1999, mostly due to Porsche's wish to build the Cayenne SUV with involvement from Volkswagen and Audi, thus requiring engineering expertise to be pulled from the motor-sports division. It was also speculated that VW-Audi chairman Ferdinand Piëch wanted Audi's new Le Mans Prototype, the Audi R8 not to face competition from Porsche in 2000. Porsche did keep part of the project alive by using the 5.5 L V10 from the prototype in a concept car shown at the 2000 Geneva Motor Show, mainly in an attempt to draw attention to their display. Surprising interest in the vehicle and an influx of revenue provided from the Cayenne helped Porsche decide to produce the car, and development started on a road-legal version that would be produced in small numbers at Porsche's new manufacturing facility in Leipzig. Porsche started a production run of Carrera GTs in 2004, shipping the units with an MSRP of $440,000 USD and a dealer invoice price of approximately $414,800 USD. In addition, the delivery charge could be as much as $5,000 USD. The first Carrera GT went on sale in the US on January 31, 2004. Originally a production run of 1,500 cars was planned. But Porsche announced in August, 2005 that it would not continue production of the Carrera GT through 2006, citing discontinuation was due to changing airbag regulations in the US. As of May 6, 2006, 1,270 GT's had been manufactured, with 604 being sold in the United States. The Carrera GT is powered by a 5.7 litre V10 engine producing 612 DIN (605 SAE) horsepower (450 kW), whereas the original concept car featured a 5.5 litre version rated at 558 hp (416 kW). Porsche claims it will accelerate from 0 to 100 km/h (62.1 mph) in 3.9 seconds and has a maximum speed of 330 km/h (205 mph), although road tests indicated that in reality the car can accelerate from 0-60 mph (97 km/h) in 3.5 seconds and 0-100 mph (160 km/h) in 6.8 seconds, while 0-125 mph (201 km/h) in 9.9 seconds. The Carrera GT has a basic five colour paint scheme which includes Guards Red, Fayence Yellow, Basalt Black, GT Silver and Seal Grey. Custom colours were also available from the factory. A traditional six-speed manual transmission is the only available transmission, in contrast to its rival the Enzo Ferrari which is only offered with a computer actuated paddle shifted manual gearbox. Attached to this gearbox is a beechwood gearknob which pays homage to the wooden gearknob used in the Porsche 917 Le Mans racers. In its second year of production, a limited edition carbon fibre knob was also made available. With the Enzo Ferrari priced initially around $660,000 USD, the Carrera GT base price of $444,400 USD makes the dream of owning a piece of Le Mans inspired technology somewhat more attainable. The Carrera GT has large side inlets and air dams that help cool the large V10 engine that had 612 bhp (456 kW; 620 PS)[citation needed] framed by the carbon fibre rear hood. Fitted with Porsche's latest Carbon fibre-reinforced Silicon Carbide (C/SiC) ceramic composite brake system, the 15-inch (380 mm) SGL Carbon disc brakes make an impressive appearance underneath the 19 inch front and 20 inch rear wheels. Similar to other Porsche models, such as the 911, the GT includes an automated rear wing spoiler which deploys above 70 mph (110 km/h). The interior is fitted with soft leather. Bose audio system and navigation systems are available as options. In typical Porsche fashion, the ignition is to the left of the steering wheel. This placement dates back to the early days of Le Mans racing when drivers were required to make a running start, hop into their cars, start them and begin the race. The placement of the ignition enabled the driver to start the car with his left hand and put it in gear with his right.

1993 Mustang Cobra R

First Generation Production 1993 Engine(s) 5.0L V8 Transmission(s) 5-speed manual Wheelbase 100.5 in (2553 mm) Length 179.6 in (4562 mm) Width 68.3 in (1735 mm) Height 52.1 in (1323 mm) The 1993 Cobra R was a stripped down version of the Mustang Cobra that was built with the racer in mind. To save weight this competition model was stripped of all but its bare essentials including air conditioning, rear carpeting and the radio system with its speakers and wiring. To further save weight they eliminated all sound dampening insulation, carpet padding, and body seam sealer. Also since a race car rarely needs rear seats they were removed with the seat belts, and seat brackets to further remove weight which also made this the only factory production Fox Body Mustang ever to come as a two seater. To further increase performance the Cobra R was equipped with larger brakes, stiffer coil springs, Koni shocks, larger anti roll bars, and a strut tower brace. To reduce operating temperatures and increase durability at race speeds the "R" was also equipped with a larger capacity radiator and oil cooler. The only exterior difference between the R model and the standard Cobra were its special five lug wheels. These were the same wheels to be used on the newly styled upcoming 1994 mustang GT. To later become known as "Tribars" Ford decided to paint them glossy black and to also polish the center caps and wheel lips to keep them distinguished from the 94- 95 wheels. Available in only Vibrant Red, only 103 1993 Cobra R models were ever produced making it one of the rarest, fastest, and most collectible Fox Body Mustangs of all time.

1994 Lamborghini Diablo 30

Lamborghini Diablo is a high-performance mid-engined sports car built by Italian automaker Lamborghini between 1990 and 2001. It was the first Lamborghini capable of attaining a top speed in excess of 200 miles per hour (320 km/h). After the end of its production run in 2001, the Diablo was replaced by the Lamborghini. Development At a time when the company was financed by the Swiss-based Mimram brothers, Lamborghini began development of what was codenamed Project 132 in June 1985 as a replacement for the Countach model. The brief stated that its top speed had to be at least 315 km/h. The design of the car was contracted to Marcello Gandini, who had designed its two predecessors. When Chrysler bought the company in 1987, providing money to complete its development, its management was unimpressed with Gandini's designs and commissioned its design team in Detroit to execute a third extensive redesign, smoothing out the trademark sharp edges and corners of Gandini's original design, and leaving him famously unimpressed. The car became known as the Diablo, despite meaning "Devil" in English, carrying on Lamborghini's tradition of naming its cars after breeds of fighting bull. The Diablo was named after a ferocious bull raised by the Duke of Veragua in the 19th century, famous for fighting an epic battle with 'El Chicorro' in Madrid on July 11 1869. The project is believed to have cost a total of 6,000,000,000 lira. Lamborghini Diablo The Diablo was presented to the public for sale on January 21, 1990 at a base price of USD $240,000 at the Hotel de Paris in Monte Carlo during the second Lamborghini Day. Power came from a 5.7-litre, 48-valve version of the legendary Lamborghini V12 featuring dual overhead cams and computer-controlled multi- point fuel injection, producing a maximum output of 492 hp (367 kW; 499 PS) and 427 ft·lbf (579 N·m) of torque. The vehicle could reach 60 mph (97 km/h) in slightly under 4 seconds, with a top speed of 202 mph (325 km/h). The Diablo was originally rear-wheel drive and the engine was mid-mounted to aid its weight balance. Even at over $240,000, the vehicle was somewhat spartan, featuring only basic radio functions (with optional CD playback) along with manual windows, adjustable but unpowered seats and no anti-lock brakes, mostly to minimize the vehicle's already high curb weight. A few options were available, including having the driver's seat molded specifically for the buyer, a rear spoiler, a factory fitted luggage set (priced at $2,600) and an exclusive Breguet clock for the dash (priced at $10,500). Diablo SE30 A lightened, hard-edged racing variant of the standard Diablo, the Diablo Special Edition (SE), was sold in limited numbers during 1994-1995 to celebrate Lamborghini's 30th anniversary. In total only about 150 cars were made. In 1995 Lamborghini introduced the Diablo SE30 Jota; the SE30 Jota was produced from the Lamborghini factory but SE30 owners also had the option of having Lamborghini upgrade their SE30 to SE30 Jota specifications. The SE30 Jota upgrade consisted of two roof mounted air scoops, a re-tuned L.I.E. chip and a six-speed all-synchromesh gearbox. With these upgrades in place the Diablo SE30 Jota could produce a claimed 595 bhp (444 kW; 603 PS) , about 70 more than the normal SE30s. In total only about 28 Jota upgrade kits were made.

1985 Ferrari 288 GTO

The Ferrari GTO (often referred to as Ferrari 288 GTO) is an exotic homologation (thus the O for Omologazione) version of the Ferrari 308 GTB produced in 1984 through 1986. The Ferrari GTO was built to compete in the new Group B Race series and a minimum of 200 cars were required for homologation. However as only Ferrari and Porsche, with their 959, entered, the series was soon abandoned leaving just the Group B Rally championship. The Porsche 959 (as the Porsche 961) only raced three times in Group B, but the 288 GTO never raced and all 272 cars built remained purely road cars. Engine: The GTO was based on the mid-engined, rear wheel drive 308 GTB. The 288 refers to its 2.8 liter V8 engine, though, as it used a de-bored (by 1 mm) V8 with twin IHI turbochargers, intercoolers, and Weber-Marelli fuel injection. The 2855 cc engine capacity was dictated by the FIA's requirement for a Turbocharged engine's capacity to be multiplied by 1.4. This gave the GTO a theoretical engine capacity of 3997 cc, just under the Group B limit of 4.0 litres. Unlike the 308, the engine was mounted longitudinally, using the 308's rear boot space. The wheelbase was 110 mm (4.3 in) longer at 2450 mm (96.5 in), and the track was widened also. With 400 hp and 366 lb·ft (496 N·m) of torque, the GTO was an impressive performer. 0-60 mph times were in the upper 4 second range and Ferrari claimed 0-125 mph (201 km/h) in 15 seconds flat. Top speed was 189 mph (304 km/h), making it the first street-legal production car to reach 300 km/h

1993 Bugatti EB110

The Bugatti EB110 is a mid-engine sports car from Bugatti Automobili SpA, the 1990s successor to one of the most celebrated marques in automotive history. It was unveiled on September 15, 1991, in both Versailles and in front of the Grande Arche at La Défense in Paris, France, exactly 110 years after Ettore Bugatti's birth. The car has a 60-valve, quad-turbo V12 powering all four wheels through a six-speed gearbox. The 3.5 L (3499 cc) engine has a bore of 81 mm (3.2 in) and a stroke of 56.6 mm (2.23 in) and is capable of 542 hp (404 kW; 550 PS) at 8000 rpm. Acceleration to 100 km/h (62 mph) takes 3.4 seconds, and the GT has a top speed of 213 mph (343 km/h). The car uses a double wishbone suspension, with the chassis built by Aerospatiale, an aircraft company, and made from carbon fibre. Equipped with Gandini's famous lifting scissor doors, it has a glass engine cover that provides a view of the V12 engine along with a speed-sensitive electronic rear wing that can be raised at the flick of a switch. The shift-knob is placed closer to the driver so that less time is taken to shift. Five pre-production prototypes with aluminum chassis were built, followed by eight with composite chassis. Following these, it is believed that only 95 GT and 31 SS production models were constructed. In 1992, a lighter and more powerful model with 592 hp (441 kW; 600 PS) at 8000 rpm, the EB110 SS (SuperSport) was introduced. This car is capable of 216 mph (348 km/h) and 0-100 km/h (62 mph) in 3.2 seconds. Early in 1994 Formula One driver Michael Schumacher purchased a banana-yellow EB 110 Super Sport, giving the company a great deal of publicity.[citation needed] Derek Hill, son of American Formula One Champion Phil Hill, was one of the three drivers on a team that competed with an EB 110 in the United States at the 1996 24 Hours of Daytona. Hard times hit the company in 1995 and, as result of chairman Artioli's over ambitious purchase of Lotus in addition to the company's quest to develop the EB112 four door car, the company was bankrupt. Dauer Racing GmbH of Nuremberg, Germany, bought the semi-finished EB 110 cars in the assembly plant plus the parts inventory through the bankruptcy trustee. The remaining chassis and a version of the engine were later developed by B Engineering into their Edonis sports car. Despite later racing for Ferrari from 1996 onwards and a high profile collision with a truck the previous year (for which he blamed the braking system) Schumacher continued to retain the EB110SS. Schumacher sold the car in 2003 to Modena Motorsport, a Ferrari garage specialising in service, race preparation and sales of classic Ferraris in Germany. B Engineering Edonis The B Engineering Edonis is based on the Bugatti EB110 Super Sport but has been extensively re-engineered, retaining little more than the carbon- fiber chassis from the original Bugatti. Both the exterior and interior of the car have been completely redesigned. The 3.5 liter Bugatti engine has had its displacement increased from 3500 cc to 3760 cc. The original four small IHI turbochargers have been replaced by two larger units from the same manufacturer. Engine power has been boosted from 449 kW (602 hp) and 650 N·m (480 lb·ft) of torque to 500 kW (670 hp) at 8000 rpm and 735 N·m (542 lb·ft). In addition, the 4WD triple-differential drivetrain from the original Bugatti has been replaced with a much simpler and lighter RWD transaxle, thus saving approximately 70 kg (154 lb) from total weight. These power figures give the 1,500 kg (3,307 lb) Edonis a power-to-weight ratio of 480 bhp/ton. In addition, the engine's specific power output is an unprecedented 181 bhp/liter. The brand claims a maximum speed of 365 km/h (227 mph), while accelerating from 0 to 100 km/h (62 mph) in only 3.9 seconds. B Engineering plans to build only 21 vehicles from chassis originally built for Bugatti by Aerospatiale (Most of the remaining chassis delivered to Bugatti prior to their bankruptcy were delivered to Jochen Dauer when he purchased the assets of the company). The Edonis is expected to sell for around €760,000. As well as the Edonis, B Engineering also provide spare parts and service for the EB110. Dauer EB110 Dauer Sportwagen in Nuremberg, Germany, bought the remaining stock of EB110 parts from the Bugatti factory. A complete spare parts catalogue, with exploded diagrams and part numbers is now available from Dauer Sportwagen. The company has used the few remaining incomplete chassis to produce the limited edition Dauer EB110. The revised car weighs 507 pounds less than the 4,233 pounds of the original US-spec Bugatti. The European version weighed 4,145 pounds, but the Dauer car weighs only 3,726, despite adopting the longer US-style bumpers, which protect the car better. The crash beams behind the bumper skins are also made from carbon fibre. The Bugatti engine is a 3.5-liter, quad-cam, five-valves-per-cylinder, 60-degree V12 with four IHI turbos. It originally came in two forms, with the EB110 GT rated at 560 bhp (420 kW) at 8,000 rpm and the "Super Sport" delivering 650 bhp (480 kW) at 8,250 rpm. The four-wheel-drive car can reach 60 mph (97 km/h) in just 3.3 seconds, achieve a standing kilometer in under 19 seconds and has an estimated maximum speed of 230 mph

1995 Excalibre Cobra Replicar

The car pictured here is a replica of the famed Caroll Shelby, AC Bristol bodied, Ford powered speed demon championship racer of the 1960's. The car shown is one of about 140 manufactured in the mid- nineties by the famed Excalibre Company of South Milwaukee, Wisconsin. This beautifully crafted car featured hand layered Fiberglass construction with 1995 Ford Mustang 5.0 litre engine, T50D Ford transmission and 8.8 inch Ford third member. The fuel-injected engine was certified by EPA and DOT and is fitted with catalytic converters. The car has a beautiful leather interior and is a big hit when shown at area car shows. Quarter mile times are around 14.1 seconds with a top speed of 140MPH.

1995 Ferrari 512M

Engine The F512M sports a 4.9 litre (4,943 cubic centimetres / 302 cubic inches) Ferrari Colombo Flat-12 engine longitudinally mid mounted. This provides a maximum torque of 500 newton metres (369 ft·lbf) at 5500 rpm and a maximum power of 328.1 kilowatts (446 PS; 440 hp) at 6750 rpm. Each cylinder has four valves, for forty-eight valves total, lubricated via a dry sump system, with a compression ratio of 10.40:1. Due to new titanium connecting rods and a new crankshaft that together weigh 7.26 kilograms (16 lb) less than those that they replace, the engine can rotate to and thus tolerate 7500 rpm, its electronic cut-off limit. The Ferrari F512M can accelerate from 0–100 km/h (62 mph) in 4.70 seconds, on to 161 km/h (100 mph) in 10.20 seconds, and it can complete a standing (from stationary) quarter mile in 12.70 seconds or a standing kilometre in 22.70 seconds. The maximum speed of the F512M is 315 kilometres per hour (196 mph). Exterior The front and rear lamps received a design change. The front lamps are now square framed lamps that are no longer hidden. The rear tail lamps are round and the bumpers have been restyled to yield a more unified look for the F512M. This car featured a different front lid with twin NACA ducts. Interior The F512M's interior received a minor update from the 512TR. The gear-shift knob now has a chromed finish, the aluminium pedals are drilled, and air conditioning is now standard equipment. Carbon fiber racing bucket seats are also available at no extra cost as they are only 14.97 kilograms (33 lb), much less than the standard seats. Pininfarina and Ferrari flags line the dash board. Wheels The F512 M has 18-inch (457 mm) wheels with a width of 8-inch (200 mm) for front and 10.5-inch (270 mm) for the rears. The tires are Pirelli P Zero, with codes for the front wheels of 235/40 ZR 18 and 295/35 ZR 18 for the rear tires. The front brakes have a diameter of 315 millimetres (12.40 in) and the rear brakes have a diameter of 310 mm (12.20 in).

1995 Ferrari F-50

The Ferrari F50 was a mid-engined range-topping sports car made by Ferrari. The F50 was introduced in 1995 to celebrate the company's 50th anniversary. The car is a two door, two seat convertible with a removable hardtop. It has a 4.7 L naturally-aspirated 60-valve V12 engine that was developed from the 3.5 L V12 used in the 1992 Ferrari F92A Formula One car. Only 349 cars were made, one fewer than Ferrari estimated they could sell. This was, in the words of Ferrari spokesman Antonio Ghini, because "Ferraris are something cultural, a monument. They must be hard to find, so we will produce one less car than the market." The last F50 was produced in Maranello, Italy in July 1997. The F50's engine pre-dated the car: It was used in the Ferrari 333 SP for the American IMSA series in 1994 allowing it to become eligible for the stock engine WSC category. Racing Following the motor sport theme, Ferrari developed the F50 GT, a prototype based on the F50 that was built to compete in GT1-class racing. The car had a fixed roof, large rear spoiler, new front spoiler and many other adjustments. The 4.7 litre V12 engine was tuned to generate around 750 bhp (559 kW). In testing in 1996 the car proved to be quicker even than the 333SP, but this went unnoticed as Ferrari cancelled the F50 GT project, instead focusing on Formula One. Ferrari sold off the three complete chassis that were built - the test car 001, 002 and 003. Chassis 002 and 003 had bodies fitted before being sold. The remaining three tubs were apparently destroyed. A custom-made F50 variant named the Bolide was commissioned by the Sultan of Brunei in 1998 and delivered in the same year. It used the F1 derived V12 engine and the same chassis, but was completely redesigned due to the monocoque construction of the body on the F50. One car was produced in the coupe configuration. Very few images and no official performance statistics of this car are available.

2006 Ford GT

The Ford GT is a mid-engined super-car. It was built by Ford Motor Company from 2003 to 2006. It began as a concept car designed in anticipation of Ford's centennial year and as part of its drive to showcase and revive its "heritage" names such as Mustang and Thunderbird. Camilo Pardo, the head of Ford's "Living Legends" studio, is credited as the chief designer of the GT and worked under the guidance of J Mays. The designers drew inspiration from Ford's classic GT40 race cars of the 1960s and the GT is sometimes mistaken for its 1960s counterpart. Positive response on the auto show circuit in 2002 helped persuade the company to produce the car in limited quantities, and the first production versions appeared in 2005. It is a very high-performance, two-seater vehicle with a strong styling resemblance to its racing ancestor and performance to match. The power-plant is a mid-mounted supercharged 5.4 litre V8, producing 550 horsepower (410 kW) and 500 foot-pounds force (680 N·m). Top speed is 212 mph (341 km/h)(electronically limited). Development At the 1995 Detroit Auto Show, the Ford GT90 concept was shown and at the 2002 show, a new GT40 Concept was unveiled by Ford. Production and Sales The GT was produced in model years 2005 and 2006, with the first customers taking delivery in August 2004. The GT began assembly and was painted by Saleen in their Saleen Special Vehicles facility in Troy, Michigan. The GT is powered by an engine built at Ford's Romeo Engine Plant in Romeo, Michigan. Installation of the engine and manual transmission along with interior finishing was handled in the SVT building at Ford's Wixom, Michigan plant. Of the 4,500 GTs originally planned, approximately 100 were to be exported to Europe, starting in late 2005. An additional 200 were destined for sale in Canada. When production ended in 2006, the full planned lot of 4500 were not produced. Approximately 550 were built in 2004, nearly 1900 in 2005, and just over 1600 in 2006, for a grand total of 4038; however, the final 11 car bodies manufactured by Mayflower Vehicle Systems were disassembled and the frames and body panels sold as service parts. The production run of 4038 GT's ended the 2006 model year on 21 September 2006, short of the originally planned 4500.[5] The Wixom Assembly Plant has stopped production of all models as of May 31, 2007.[6] Sales of the GT continued into 2007, from cars held in storage and in dealer inventories. Performance and Engineering The Ford GT features many new and unique technologies, including super-plastic-formed aluminium body panels, roll-bonded floor panels, a friction-stir welded center-tunnel, a "ship-in-a-bottle" gas tank, a cap-less fuel filler system, one-piece door panels and an aluminium engine cover with a one-piece carbon-fiber inner panel. Brakes are four-piston aluminium Brembo clipers with cross-drilled and vented rotors at all four corners. When the rear canopy is opened, the rear suspension components and engine are visible. The 5.4L Modular V8 power-plant is all-aluminium and fed by a Lysholm twin screw-type supercharger. It features a forged rotating assembly housed in an aluminium block designed specifically for the GT program. A dry sump oiling system is employed, allowing the engine to sit very low in the frame. The DOHC 4-valve heads are a revision of the 2000 Ford Mustang SVT Cobra R cylinder heads (with slightly increased wall casting thickness in the exhaust port). The camshafts have unique specifications, with more lift and duration than those found in the Shelby GT500 or 2003–2004 Ford Mustang SVT Cobra. Power output is 550 horsepower (410 kW) and 500 foot-pounds force (680 N·m) of torque. A Ricardo six-speed manual transmission is fitted featuring a helical limited-slip differential. Performance 0–60 mph (0–96 km/h): 3.7 seconds 0–100 mph (0–160 km/h): 7.4 seconds Standing 1/4 mile: 11.2 seconds @ 131.2 mph (211.1 km/h).

2009 Chevrolet Corvette

The C6 ZR1 is a high performance version of the C6 Chevrolet Corvette. It is the fastest and most powerful Corvette ever produced. Both the C3 from 1969-1971 and C4 Corvettes from 1990-1995 had ZR-1 models. Engine Design The ZR1 engine is a heavily modified version of the LS3, designated the LS9. Producing 638 hp (476 kW) and 604 ftlbf (819 N·m). of torque, it is the most powerful production Corvette to date. The LS9 has a sixth-generation Eaton TVS R2300 roots 4-lobe supercharger with an intercooler. The supercharger's four-lobe design offers improved efficiency over three-lobe models. To avoid changes to the hood appearance, the supercharger's output was split into two halves. Each cylinder bank has an intercooler. The intercoolers are from Behr, utilizing an air-to-water, dual-brick design. The LS3 engine block will be used because the cylinder walls of the LS3 are thicker than the Z06's LS7 since the LS3 uses smaller pistons. Oil injectors, for improved cooling and noise reduction, will be used for the first time in a production Corvette. Connecting rods and the inlet valve will be made of titanium. Heads will be from a special heat resistant aluminum alloy from the LS9's manufacturing process. The camshaft lift was reduced from the LS7's to improve idle quality. With the addition of the supercharger to the 6.2 liter LS9, the higher lift camshaft was no longer necessary to achieve horsepower targets. Lubrication will be provided by an improved version of the LS7's dry sump system. Transmission The ZR1 flywheel has been improved over the 2008 Z06. The flywheel was upgraded by going from six to a nine bolt design and cutting off nearly 9.8 ounces for improved throttle response and acceleration. The transmission is a 6-speed manual Tremec TR6060 with a MH3 gearset. The 2008 Z06 featured the MM6 gearset. Differential/Drive The differential is a limited slip with carbon and steel plates. The differential uses SAE 5W-80 Dexron LS lubricant. The two half shafts have different diameters. The difference in half shafts are designed to minimize wheel hop during hard launches. The driver side half shaft is larger than the passenger side to balance the weight of the battery which is on the passenger side of the ZR1. Production Production vehicles are hand assembled in Bowling Green, Kentucky. The ZR1 engines are built at the General Motor Performance Build Center in Wixom, Michigan. Ride Control The name of the ride control system is Magnetic Selective Ride Control (MSRC). MSRC is provided by Delphi. The system uses two modes of control: Tour and Sport. The system offers standing start launch modifications. When launching the ZR1 from a standing start, the shocks are completely softened on launch and stiffened on rebound. The softened shocks on launch aid the ZR1 by allowing weight to transfer to the rear, aiding traction. The ride control standing launch modifications are designed to minimize bounce. Chassis/Body Right rear 3/4 view of Corvette ZR1 The chassis, similar to the 2008 Z06, is made of aluminum. To cut weight, many panels are made of carbon fiber. Panels made of carbon fiber are the fenders, hood, roof, splitter, and rocker extensions. To prevent the sun from damaging the carbon fiber, panels are protected with a special paint treatment. The rear wheels are the largest ever mounted on a production Corvette with 335/25 Michelin Pilot Sport PS2 tires on ultra-light 20 in (510 mm) rims. The official curb weight of the 2009 ZR1 was released to be 3,352 lb (1,520 kg). Clutch The 260 mm (10 in) ZF-Sachs twin-plate clutch supplants Z06's 290 mm (11 in) single-plate unit to reduce inertia for better shift feel. The lower clamping force reduces clutch-pedal effort. The clutch upgrade is considered a dramatic improvement over the unit employed within the Z06. Brakes The front brake rotors are the same carbon ceramic design as those employed in the Ferrari FXX track car, the difference being a diameter reduction from 15.75 in (400 mm) to 15.5 in (390 mm) for added wheel clearance. The front calipers are Brembo 6 piston. Rears calipers are Brembo 4 piston. The rear brakes are 15 in (380 mm) carbon ceramic rotors, originally designed as the Enzo Ferrari's front rotors. Both front and rear pads have twice.

2009 Mercedes- Benz SL65 AMG Black Series

Sensational appearance, unique performance data, with light-weight design throughout and total exclusivity - that's the new Mercedes-Benz SL65 AMG Black Series. This high-performance coupé is a motorsport engineering thoroughbred, opening up new drive dynamic vistas to sports car enthusiasts. The AMG 6.0 litre V12 biturbo engine, with a maximum output of 493 kW/670 hp and 1000 Newtonmetres of torque, guarantees super sports car level performance. The powerful two-seater was developed in the AMG Performance Studio and represents the continuation of the highly successful Black Series strategy pursued by AMG, the Mercedes-Benz Cars Performance brand. Wide cooling air apertures in the front apron and the bonnet are the clearest indication of the massive power of this AMG twelve-cylinder, biturbocharged engine. From its 5980 cubic capacity, the AMG V12's engine generates a maximum power of 493 kW/670 hp at 5400 rpm and an electronically limited torque of 1000 Newtonmetres between 2200 and 4200 rpm. Without a limiter, the AMG 6.0 litre V12 biturbo engine, which is hand-built in the AMG engine factory in accordance with the "one man - one engine" philosophy, would achieve a maximum torque of 1200 Newtonmetres. Compared with the basis power pack in the 450 kW/612 hp Mercedes-Benz SL65 AMG, new turbochargers were developed for the twelve-cylinder Mercedes-Benz SL65 AMG Black Series engine. The turbochargers' spiral cross-section, now twelve per cent larger, and the optimised wastegate ducts permit increased air throughput and an even more impressive display of power in all engine speed ranges. The modified intake air ducting results in an even more spontaneous response. The new design for the AMG sports exhaust gas system's rear silencers reduce the exhaust gas backpressure and help increase the power output. The acoustic side effect of this is to produce a distinctive twelve-cylinder sound, typically evocative of AMG engine tuning, from the two trapezoidal tail pipes. The low-temperature charge air cooler, now 30 per cent more powerful, and the optimised water cooling system guarantee not only that the power generated under extreme dynamic driving conditions is exploited to the maximum but also the greatest possible fatigue strength at high outside temperatures. The extraordinary engine specifications, which make the Mercedes-Benz SL65 AMG Black Series the most powerful AMG model yet, help to produce unique performance data: from a standing start, it takes just 3.9 seconds to reach 100 km/h; 200 km/h is attained after 11.0 seconds. The top speed is 320 km/h (electronically limited). Equally responsible for its excellent dynamics is the attractive power-to-weight ratio of only 2.79 hp/kg, resulting from the comparably low unladen weight of 1870 kilograms, according to EU standard measurement. This makes the Mercedes-Benz SL65 AMG Black Series some 250 kilograms lighter than the Mercedes-Benz SL65 AMG a respectable weight saving due specifically to the use of lightweight construction. Numerous bodywork components are made of high-strength and particularly light carbon fibre composites (CFRP), a well-proven motorsports technology. The 14 centimetre wider front mudguard, the front apron with the visible carbon front splitter, the bonnet and the boot lid are all made from CFRP. Large apertures in the bonnet ensure that excess heat is reliably ducted away from the engine. "V12 Biturbo" lettering on the front mudguards gives an indication of the engine's power. Power transmission with double-declutch function and four transmission modes. Matching the outstanding performance potential and the versatile drive dynamics, the Mercedes-Benz SL65 AMG Black Series also displays its power pack and suspension at their best. An AMG SPEEDSHIFT PLUS five-speed automatic gearbox transmits power to the rear wheels. There is a choice between four transmission modes: "C", "S", "M1" and "M2" which has gearshift times 25 per cent quicker than the "M1" mode. The torque converter's lockup clutch guarantees extremely direct gearshifting in all driving situations right from first gear. The automatic double-declutch function not only makes shifting down a more pleasurable task, it also ensures that the load alteration effect is reduced. AMG adjustable coil spring sports suspension and 3-stage ESP, as for the suspension, the AMG experts have put their trust in a new design. The AMG sports suspension has been designed on adjustable coil spring lines; this well-proven motorsports solution allows the shock absorbers' rebound and compression stages, the ride height, wheel alignment and camber to be adjusted. This means that the driver can adjust the suspension to suit his own personal specifications when driving on racing circuits. The spring links, camber struts and pull/push rods on both axles are new developments and each axle has a weight-optimised aluminium wheel carrier. Compared with the standard Mercedes-Benz SL65 AMG, the Black Series front axle track width is 97 millimetres wider and the rear axle track width 85 millimetres wider. The new front axle kinematics produce an 8 per cent more direct steering ratio; and the completely re-designed elastokinematics ensure noticeably greater steering precision. A multiple-disc limited-slip differential on the rear axle with a 40 per cent locking effect guarantees optimum traction. The large AMG high-performance brake system can be seen through the filigree structure of the AMG twin-spoke light-alloy wheels. Internally ventilated and perforated disc brakes engineered in particularly strong composite materials are employed all round. On the front axle, braking is undertaken by six-piston fixed callipers and 390 x 36 mm discs; on the rear axles, this task is carried out by four-piston fixed callipers and 360 x 26 mm discs.

Maserati Barchetta

The Maserati Barchetta is a mid-engined, two-door, two-seat Le Mans-style sports car, in the spirit of the 350 and 450S, that was designed by Carlo Gaino of the "Synthesis Design", an Italian design house. Fifteen units of the racing model were produced at the De Tomaso factory in Modena, plus two prototypes (one racing-corsa, one street-stradale). It featured a mid-engine V6 AM501 Maserati biturbo engine 1996cc (red intake manifold for the Corsa) an evolution of the AM490 (black intake manifold used for the Stradale), a central frame holding an integral fuel tank and a very light glass fiber/carbon fiber spyder body, accelerating the car to about 180 mph (290 km/h). The development of a road version was stopped at a late stage. Today some racing cars hold a road title in Europe, after minor modifications to allow road compatibility. The racing series Grantrofeo Barchetta was held 1992 and 1993. It has featured sixteen races total, most of them in Italy. The central-frame concept was survived on the De Tomaso Guarà, but the frame was around 13 cm (5.1 in) longer because it was engined by a longer V8. This was thought as a way to inject much needed excitement and enthusiasm for the carmake whose reputation had been badly ruined by years of producing unreliable products, eventually culminating in Maserati's withdrawal from the North American market. It is also true that the amount of delicate maintenance necessary to take care of these high output small engine was not compatible with the auto repair industry in several territories. This model has become a collector item valued at several time its introduction price.

Maserati MC12

The Maserati MC12 is a grand tourer produced by Maserati to allow a racing variant to compete in the FIA GT Championship. The car entered production in 2004 with 30 cars produced (five of which were not for sale). A further 25 were produced in 2005 making a total of 50 cars available for customers, each of which were pre-sold for €600 000. Maserati designed and built the car on the chassis of the Enzo Ferrari but the final car is much larger. The MC12 is longer, wider and taller than the Enzo Ferrari, which has faster acceleration and a higher top speed. The top speed of the Maserati MC12 is 330 kilometers per hour (205 mph) whereas the top speed of the Enzo Ferrari is 350 kilometres per hour (217.5 mph). The MC12 was developed to signal Maserati's return to racing after 37 years. The road version was produced to homologate the race version. One requirement for participation in the FIA GT is the production of at least 25 road cars. Three GT1 race cars were entered into the FIA GT with great success. Maserati began racing the MC12 in the FIA GT toward the end of the 2004 season, winning the race held at the Zhuhai International Circuit. The racing MC12s were entered into the American Le Mans Series races in 2005 but exceeded the size restrictions and consequently paid weight penalties. Development Development of the Maserati MC12 began while Maserati was owned by Ferrari in order to create a race car for Maserati that would be eligible to compete in the FIA GT. Its initial name was the MCC, meaning Maserati Corse Competizione, and development under the direction of Giorgio Ascanelli was planned to be simultaneous with that of the MCS, the road going version. The body shape was developed from an idea by Giorgetto Giugiaro during wind tunnel testing, though the majority of styling was by Frank Stephenson. The MCC had a very similar body shape to the MC12 but there were several key differences, most notably the rear spoiler. Andrea Bertolini was the chief test driver throughout the development (although some testing was done by Michael Schumacher), frequently testing the MCC at the Fiorano Circuit. As the MCC was developed further, word of the MCS ceased and eventually the final name, MC12, was announced. The car is based heavily on the Enzo Ferrari, sharing the same Ferrari Dino V12 engine with slight modifications, the same gearbox (but renaming it Maserati Cambiocorsa) and the same chassis and track (length of axle between the wheels). The Maserati MC12 has its own bodywork which is wider, longer and slightly taller leaving the windshield as the only externally visible component shared with the Enzo. This extra size allows for greater downforce across the whole body, adding to that of the two metre spoiler. Overview The MC12 is a two-door coupe with a targa top roof, although the detached roof cannot be stored in the car. The mid-rear layout (engine between the axles but behind the cabin) keeps the centre of gravity in the middle of the car, which increases stability and improves the car's cornering ability. The standing weight distribution is 41% front: 59% rear; at speed however, the downforce provided by the rear spoiler affects this such that at 200 kilometres per hour (125 mph), the effective weight distribution is 34% front: 66% rear. Interior Even though the car is designed as a homologation vehicle and is a modification of a racing car, the interior is intended to be luxurious. The interior is a mix of gel- coated carbon fibre, blue leather and silver "Brightex": a synthetic material which was found to be "too expensive for the fashion industry. The centre console features the characteristic Maserati oval analogue clock and a blue ignition button, but it has been criticised for lacking a radio, car stereo or a place to install an after market sound system. Exterior The body of the car, made entirely of carbon fibre, has undergone extensive wind tunnel testing to achieve maximum downforce across all surfaces. As a result, the rear spoiler is two metres (79 in) wide but only 30 millimetres (1.2 in) thick, the underside of the car is smooth, and the rear bumper has diffusers to take advantage of ground effect. Air is sucked into the engine compartment through the air scoop; its positioning on top of the cabin makes the car taller than the Enzo. The exterior is available only in the white and blue colour scheme, a tribute to the America Camoradi racing team that drove the Maserati Tipo Birdcages in the early 1960s. The car is noted for the awkwardness that results from its size: very long and wider than a Hummer H2. This, combined with the lack of a rear window, makes parking the MC12 very difficult. Engine The MC12 sports a 232 kilogram (511 lb), six-litre (5,998 cc/366 cu in) Enzo Ferrari-derived V12 engine, mounted at 65°. Each cylinder has four valves, lubricated via a dry sump system, and a compression ratio of 11.2:1. These combine to provide a maximum torque of 652 newton metres (481 lbf·ft) at 5500 rpm and a maximum power of 465 kilowatts (632 PS/621 bhp) at 7500 rpm. The redline rpm is indicated at 7500—despite being safe up to 7700—whereas the Enzo has redline at 8200 rpm. The Maserati MC12 can accelerate from 0–100 kilometres per hour (62 mph) in 3.8 seconds (though Motor Trend Magazine managed 3.7 seconds) and on to 200 kilometres per hour (125 mph) in 9.9 seconds. It can complete a standing (from

Porsche Carrera GT

The development of Carrera GT can be traced back to its predecessors, the 911 GT1 and LMP1-98 racing cars. Due in part to the FIA and ACO rule changes in 1998, both designs had ended. Porsche at the time had planned on a new Le Mans prototype for 1999. The car was initially intended to use a turbocharged flat-6, but was later redesigned to use a new V10 engine, pushing the project back to planned competition in 2000. The V10 was a unit secretly built by Porsche for the Footwork Formula One team in 1992, but later shelved. The engine was resurrected for the Le Mans prototype and increased in size to 5.7 litres. Unfortunately the project was canceled after two days of testing for the first car, in mid-1999, mostly due to Porsche's wish to build the Cayenne SUV with involvement from Volkswagen and Audi, thus requiring engineering expertise to be pulled from the motor-sports division. It was also speculated that VW-Audi chairman Ferdinand Piëch wanted Audi's new Le Mans Prototype, the Audi R8 not to face competition from Porsche in 2000. Porsche did keep part of the project alive by using the 5.5 L V10 from the prototype in a concept car shown at the 2000 Geneva Motor Show, mainly in an attempt to draw attention to their display. Surprising interest in the vehicle and an influx of revenue provided from the Cayenne helped Porsche decide to produce the car, and development started on a road-legal version that would be produced in small numbers at Porsche's new manufacturing facility in Leipzig. Porsche started a production run of Carrera GTs in 2004, shipping the units with an MSRP of $440,000 USD and a dealer invoice price of approximately $414,800 USD. In addition, the delivery charge could be as much as $5,000 USD. The first Carrera GT went on sale in the US on January 31, 2004. Originally a production run of 1,500 cars was planned. But Porsche announced in August, 2005 that it would not continue production of the Carrera GT through 2006, citing discontinuation was due to changing airbag regulations in the US. As of May 6, 2006, 1,270 GT's had been manufactured, with 604 being sold in the United States. The Carrera GT is powered by a 5.7 litre V10 engine producing 612 DIN (605 SAE) horsepower (450 kW), whereas the original concept car featured a 5.5 litre version rated at 558 hp (416 kW). Porsche claims it will accelerate from 0 to 100 km/h (62.1 mph) in 3.9 seconds and has a maximum speed of 330 km/h (205 mph), although road tests indicated that in reality the car can accelerate from 0-60 mph (97 km/h) in 3.5 seconds and 0-100 mph (160 km/h) in 6.8 seconds, while 0-125 mph (201 km/h) in 9.9 seconds. The Carrera GT has a basic five colour paint scheme which includes Guards Red, Fayence Yellow, Basalt Black, GT Silver and Seal Grey. Custom colours were also available from the factory. A traditional six-speed manual transmission is the only available transmission, in contrast to its rival the Enzo Ferrari which is only offered with a computer actuated paddle shifted manual gearbox. Attached to this gearbox is a beechwood gearknob which pays homage to the wooden gearknob used in the Porsche 917 Le Mans racers. In its second year of production, a limited edition carbon fibre knob was also made available. With the Enzo Ferrari priced initially around $660,000 USD, the Carrera GT base price of $444,400 USD makes the dream of owning a piece of Le Mans inspired technology somewhat more attainable. The Carrera GT has large side inlets and air dams that help cool the large V10 engine that had 612 bhp (456 kW; 620 PS)[citation needed] framed by the carbon fibre rear hood. Fitted with Porsche's latest Carbon fibre-reinforced Silicon Carbide (C/SiC) ceramic composite brake system, the 15-inch (380 mm) SGL Carbon disc brakes make an impressive appearance underneath the 19 inch front and 20 inch rear wheels. Similar to other Porsche models, such as the 911, the GT includes an automated rear wing spoiler which deploys above 70 mph (110 km/h). The interior is fitted with soft leather. Bose audio system and navigation systems are available as options. In typical Porsche fashion, the ignition is to the left of the steering wheel. This placement dates back to the early days of Le Mans racing when drivers were required to make a running start, hop into their cars, start them and begin the race. The placement of the ignition enabled the driver to start the car with his left hand and put it in gear with his right.

Saleen S7

The Saleen S7 is a limited-production, hand-built, high-performance automobile developed jointly by Saleen, Hidden Creek Industries, Phil Frank Design, and Ray Mallock Ltd. with RML taking full credit designing and developing the S7 and produced solely by Saleen in Irvine, California. It is the first car produced by Saleen not based on an existing design. The S7 debuted on August 19, 2000 at the Monterey Historic Races. From 2000 until 2004, the S7 featured a naturally aspirated V8 engine with 550 horsepower (410 kW). In 2005, the S7 was replaced by the S7 Twin Turbo, which featured a more powerful twin-turbo system that boosted engine power to 750 horsepower (760 PS/559 kW) and the top speed to an estimated 250 mph (402 km/h). Exterior A Speedlab yellow Saleen S7 The body of the car, made entirely from carbon fiber, incorporates the use of scoops, spoilers, and other aerodynamic features to create split-channel airflow throughout the car, and at 160 miles per hour (257 km/h), the car creates its own weight in downforce. Theoretically, the car produces enough downforce to drive upside down. Interior The interior of the Saleen S7 was designed to be both luxurious and functional. Leather appears throughout the cabin, with aluminum accents, and the S7 comes with a set of custom-fit luggage. Because of the car's mid-engine layout, it has two trunks, front and rear. Other features include an LCD monitor, rear-view camera, quick-release steering-wheel and a 240 mile per hour (386 km/h) speedometer. The cabin is of an asymmetrical layout, with the custom-fitted driver's seat positioned toward the center both to improve the driver's visibility and center their weight in the vehicle. Chassis The chassis comprises a space frame-derived design consisting 4130 lightweight steel and aluminum honeycomb composite reinforcing panels. It is divided into bolt-fastened sub-assemblies to allow for rapid access to critical subsystems. The light weight of the chassis allows for the car to weigh a mere 2750 pounds (1247 kg). Engine The original Saleen S7 sported a 7-liter (7008 cc/427.6 cu in), naturally-aspirated, all-aluminum OHV V8 engine, mounted at 90° approximately in the middle of the chassis for a balanced mid-engine layout that delivered power to the rear wheels while keeping the center of gravity towards the middle of the car, improving overall performance. Each cylinder is lubricated via a dry sump system, has two stainless steel valves per cylinder, a compression ratio of 10.0:1, and a bore and stroke of 4.125 and 4.00 inches (104.9 and 101.6 mm), respectively. The original engine developed a maximum power of 550 horsepower (558 PS/410 kW) at 6400 rpm and a maximum torque of 525 foot-pounds (712 N·m) at 4000 rpm. The redline rpm is indicated at 6500 rpm. A pair of ball-bearing turbos were added for the 2005 model year, increasing horsepower to 750 bhp (559 kW; 760 PS). The engine is connected to a 6-speed manual transaxle with full synchromesh, a 4-plate clutch, and a limited slip differential. Gear 1 2 3 4 5 6 Final Drive Ratio 2.46:1 2.06:1 1.47:1 1.18:1 0.958:1 0.74:1 3.22:1 Performance The S7 can accelerate from 0-60 miles per hour (97 km/h) in an estimated 2.8 seconds, and to 100 miles per hour in an estimated 8.1 seconds. It can complete a standing quarter mile in an estimated 11.75 seconds, reaching 126 miles per hour (203 km/h). The maximum speed of the car is above 200 miles per hour (322 km/h).